The Wreath Lectures 2015

As promised, the second part of my Christmas blog. I previously called my round-up of local lovely wreaths ‘Wreathed in Glory‘, but the Mr suggested that The Wreath Lectures was a much better title, and of course he was right, so the new title has been adopted forthwith.

My hunt for new and lovely wreaths hung on local doors has actually become more challenging, as this is our 4th Christmas in our home, and since starting this blog, and I have realised that lots of people put the same wreaths up every year – how dare they! 

I had to deal with this challenge by throwing the net a bit further afield – not too difficult to adjust my local walks when trying to get the baby to nap, as pacing the streets with her in the buggy is part of the regular routine – but perhaps it was a bit much to actually align my walks with some of the posher local streets to try and get a snap of more glamorous wreaths? Slightly too much?

It didn’t actually pay off that well, as the smarter the street, the longer the drive or path and the less easy to get a good picture. I don’t creep up people’s drives just to get a picture of their wreath and anyone who says I do is lying. (Line lifted from Richard Herring, in case anyone thinks I am blatantly nicking from him!)

Despite this, I still managed to find some new and lovely wreaths and I applaud my neighbours for their good taste. As ever, photos have been cropped to try and protect house numbers, so apologies for the wonkiness and shonkiness.

  
Lovely all-silver wreath. I like how distinctive the shapes of the pine cones remain – this wreath retains the feel of the natural shapes and textures but also stands out from the rest with its colour. Sci-fi meets nature.

  
And lovely all-gold wreath. These were actually on neighbouring houses, almost as if they’d planned it between them.

  
Heart-shaped dried orange wreath – in a local pub rather than house. I approve of pubs that do their bit for my wreath quest and put up good ones, as taking a photo of a pub feels less naughty than one of someone’s house.

This was the first I saw of what might be a new trend for heart-shaped wreaths, including a cool chilli one. 

  

Hearts are the new thing, it would seem. I did see at least 2 or 3 more, but didn’t manage to get any pictures of them.

  
Stylish all-white wreath – monochrome wreaths are always in style, but I particularly liked this one.

  
Another simple wreath with berries, but the addition of the golden hanging ribbon gives it a glamorous touch.

  
A real favourite, though a world away from my usual preference for natural objects and tones – how could multicoloured spangles not be a joyful thing to see on a door at this gloomy time of year? I know it would find favour with the big girl.

(Incidentally, if I was going to throw out all my Christmas decorations and start again, I think I might be inspired by Nadiya from GBBO and her peacock cake, and this gorgeous peacock decoration I saw at the Dulwich Trader – when I saw it I yearned for it. Peacock, jade and turquoise shades go straight onto my fantasy list for future Christmas themes).

  
Finally, something a little more achievable which I could see myself trying out – jaunty pompom wreath made by community sewing group The Stitch. I haven’t made a woollen pompom for years, but maybe next year I will, if I’m not busy drying out oranges to make a heart-shaped wreath, of course. 

  
That’s the wreath round-up for 2015. Hope that 2016 brings lots of good things and happy times your way!

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One thought on “The Wreath Lectures 2015

  1. Pingback: The Wreath Lectures, 2016 | ladymissalbertine

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